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What to Expect

equipment close upYou might be going to a regularly-scheduled eye exam. You may be following a recommendation to see an eye doctor after a vision screening at a local clinic or wellness center. Or your next eye doctor visit could be a response to vision problems or eye discomfort.

 

The more you know going in, the easier the entire vision care process will be.

For regularly scheduled eye exams, expect to talk about any changes in your medical history since the last time you saw your eye doctor. And if this is your first time in a new practice, you’ll be asked to provide a more complete medical history, including a list of medications you’re currently taking, and any vision problems your parents may have experienced.

In addition, you’ll undergo a series of vision and eye tests that help determine the overall health and quality of your vision. These tests also help to check that your current prescription glasses or contacts (if you have one) is still meeting your vision needs. Your eye doctor will also check your eyes for signs of any potential vision problems or eye diseases. In many instances, your pupil may be dilated (opened) using special drops so that your eye doctor can better see the structures of the eye.

You’ll then have an honest discussion about the current state of your eye health and vision, and your eye doctor may “prescribe” vision correction for you in the form of eyeglasses or contact lenses. Any health concerns or possibly serious vision complications will also be discussed, including the next steps you must take to preserve and protect your sight.

In general, a routine eye exam will last less than an hour depending upon the number of tests you have, and may be partially or completely covered by many vision insurance plans.

Visiting eye doctors as a result of a vision screening is also common, but remember: vision screenings offered by health clinics, pediatricians, public schools or local charitable organizations are not a substitute for comprehensive eye exams. Be sure to bring the findings from your screening to your eye doctor—it’s a great way to begin the discussion of your current eye health.

For eye doctor visits that result from eye pain, eye discomfort or vision problems you actually can see, expect to take many of the steps involved in a routine eye exam, but specific to the symptoms you’re having. There may be a number of additional tests required as well, so it’s important—especially when suffering pain or discomfort—to allow for as much time as possible for a complete, comprehensive eye exam.

And if you feel you are in an emergency situation with your eyes or your vision—don’t wait. Seek immediate emergency medical treatment.

What to remember

Many vision problems and eye diseases often present minimal, if any, symptoms. That’s why it’s so important to make regular appointments to see your eye doctor. And since vision can change gradually over time, it’s important to know that you’re seeing your best, year after year.

Remember the following for your next eye doctor visit:

  • Know your medical history and list of current medications
  • Know your current symptoms and be able to describe them—write them down if necessary
  • Know your family history—some eye diseases like glaucoma and cataracts are hereditary
  • Ask in advance about your particular vision insurance plan, and if a co-pay will be due
  • Bring your insurance card, identification and method of payment, if necessary
  • Bring your most recent prescription for glasses or contact lenses
  • Bring your corrective eyewear to the exam
  • If undergoing a test using dilation eye drops, bring proper eye protection, like sunglasses, for after your appointment

Most importantly, remember that eye doctors—and everyone within the eyecare practice—are there to help you see your best and feel your best  

 

Special thanks to the EyeGlass Guide, for information material that aided in the creation of this website. Visit the EyeGlass Guide today!

   

COVID-19 News

 

 

covid header

We are following recommendations from our governing body to postpone routine vision care, and are only opening the office to emergency patients at this time. Patients can reach the office by calling 856-832-4950 or emailing us at vec@sjvillageeyecare.com. We will be returning phone calls and emails in a timely manner.

In the meantime, here are some recommendations to stay healthy while we work through this:

Urgent/Emergency Eye Care:

⁃ Avoid urgent care and the hospitals for eye problems to keep the hospitals more available for COVID-19 care. Call or email our office for emergency eye care needs.

Vision Strain Awareness:

⁃ Children and adults alike are about to spend even more time than usual on their tablets, phones and computers and the risk of eye strain will consequently be much higher. To reduce the risk of eye strain, try to follow the “Rule of Twenty”; when performing prolonged near activities, do the following:

- Maintain a working distance of at least 20 inches (the further you hold things from your face the less focusing effort is required).

- Take a vision break every 20 minutes to look far away (at least 20 feet) for at least 20 seconds.

- For children, the break should be longer.

Social Distancing:

⁃ Help everyone stay safe by social distancing and eliminating unnecessary social interactions. This will make a huge difference in delaying the load on our hospital system so everyone has the best chance of surviving when they become infected with COVID-19

Contact Lens Care:

⁃ Remove your contact lenses nightly. Even if you've been told they are safe to sleep in and you've been doing it with no problems, this is not the time to get an eye infection.

⁃ When you remove your lenses be sure to clean them with designated contact lens cleaning solution, using fresh solution nightly. DO NOT USE WATER!

⁃ Keep your contact lens case clean! If you are having trouble finding cases or contact lens solution to purchase, we have some available at no charge.

⁃ Throw away your lenses on time. Acuvue Oasys lenses are designed to be thrown away every 2 weeks, while other brands such as Air Optix, Biofinity and are monthly disposable lenses. Daily disposable lenses are single use lenses and should be thrown away after every use. If you aren’t sure what your disposal schedule is supposed to be, contact us via email (vec@sjvillageeyecare.com) and we will be happy to help you.

⁃ If you are at risk of running out of contact lenses, our office can order you more and have them shipped directly to your home.

Emergency Glasses:

⁃ If you have the misfortune of breaking your glasses, contact us and we will do our best to get you an emergency pair as soon as possible.

Our office number is (856-832-4950) and our direct email address is vec@sjvillageeyecare.com. We check our messages and email regularly and will respond as soon as possible.

Wishing the best for you and your families and looking forward to working together during this crisis and into the future!